Regulatory capture is a reality


And it’s happening here in Canada.


THE REVOLVING DOOR, ACADEMIC CAPTURE, AND MORE

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01.


WHEN PUBLIC POLICY is enacted in the interest of private industry, rather than in the public interest, that’s regulatory capture.


Though such tactics might seem complex or sophisticated, in reality they’re quite simple to observe. The Regulatory Capture Lab examines this capture, why it happens and how.

02.


CAPTURE HAPPENS in a wide range of industries, from oil and agribusiness to finance. Big Tech is no different.


Researchers have identified the ways in which Big Tech enacts capture in the United States and Europe. The same patterns are emerging in Canada, although they’ve often escaped public scrutiny.

03.


IT LARGELY happens in plain sight.


Regulatory capture is easy enough to track if you know where to look. In large measure it happens through academic capture and the revolving door of employment between government and the private sector.

Our initial research focus is on the influence of foreign tech firms on Canadian public policy both in the federal government and in academia.


CAPTURE IN
CANADA


THE REVOLVING
DOOR


ACADEMIC
CAPTURE


ABOUT US


The Regulatory Capture Lab is a new collaboration between the Centre for Digital Rights and FRIENDS. Together we are building a clear, research-informed picture of how decision-making works in Canada, to document the crossover between public offices and corporate interests, and to stimulate debate about power and influence in Canadian digital policy. Contact us at info@regulatorycapturelab.ca.


            

Research support for this project was provided by students from McMaster University’s Master of Public Policy in Digital Society program.

Graphic art by Atelier Michèle Champagne. Edit by No Media. Read our privacy policy.


ABOUT US


The Regulatory Capture Lab is a new collaboration between the Centre for Digital Rights and FRIENDS. Together we are building a clear, research-informed picture of how decision-making works in Canada, to document the crossover between public offices and corporate interests, and to stimulate debate about power and influence in Canadian digital policy.

Contact us at info@regulatorycapturelab.ca.








Research support for this project was provided by students from the McMaster University’s Master of Public Policy in Digital Society program.

Graphic art by Atelier Michèle Champagne. Edit by No Media. Read our privacy policy.